That night Jobs took his Macintosh team out to dinner at

That night Jobs took his Macintosh team out to dinner at Nina’s Café in

Woodside. Jean-Louis Gassée was in town because Sculley wanted him

to prepare to take over the Macintosh division, and Jobs invited him to

 

join them. Belleville proposed a toast “to those of us who really understand

what the world according to Steve Jobs is all about.” That phrase—“the world

according to Steve”—had been used dismissively by others at Apple who

belittled the reality warp he created. After the others left, Belleville sat with

Jobs in his Mercedes and urged him to

organize a battle to the death with Sculley.

Months earlier, Apple had gotten the right to export computers to China,

and Jobs had been invited to sign a deal in the Great Hall of the People over

the 1985 Memorial Day weekend. He had told Sculley, who decided he wanted

to go himself, which was just fine with Jobs. Jobs decided to use Sculley’s absence

to execute his coup. Throughout the week leading up to Memorial Day,

he took a lot of people on walks to share his plans. “I’m going to launch a

coup while John is in China,” he told Mike Murray.

Seven Days in May

Thursday, May 23: At his regular Thursday meeting with his top lieutenants

in the Macintosh division, Jobs told his inner circle about his plan to oust Sculley.

He also confided in the corporate human resources director, Jay Elliot, who

told him bluntly that the proposed rebellion wouldn’t work. Elliot had talked

to some board members and urged them to stand up for Jobs, but he

discovered that most of the board was with Sculley, as were most members of

Apple’s senior staff. Yet Jobs barreled ahead. He even revealed his plans to

Gassée on a walk around the parking lot, despite the fact that Gassée had come from

 

Paris to take his job.

“I made the mistake of telling

Gassée,” Jobs wryly

conceded years later.

sh419vc.com